The Boxer Breed

Boxers are large, muscular, square-headed dogs who look imposing--that is, until you look into their eyes and see the mischief and joy of life reflected there. Because of their playful nature and boundless energy, they are sometimes called the "Peter Pan" of the dog breeds. Boxers aren't considered fully mature until they are three years old, meaning they have one of the longest puppyhood in the world of dogs.

The typical Boxer is intelligent, alert, and fearless, yet friendly. He's loyal to his family and loves to play with them, but he's also headstrong, especially if you try to use harsh training methods with him.

With minimal grooming needs and legendary patience and gentleness with children, Boxers are great family companions, as long as you provide them with the physical exercise and mental stimulation they need. If you're willing and able to provide them with adequate exercise in the form of walks or runs, they can even adapt to apartment living, so long as they are able to be close to their beloved people
Boxers are renowned for their great love of and loyalty to their families. They often are distrustful of strangers at first, but will not be aggressive unless they perceive a threat to their families. Boxers are so loving that they often think they are lapdogs and try to lie as close to you as possible.

Boxer owners around the world take special delight in their beloved dogs' clownish behavior. Boxers are high-spirited, happy, and energetic. They often paw, cat-like, at their toys, food bowls, and even their owners. When they are excited, they often "kidney bean," a little dance that involves twisting their bodies into a semi-circle, similar to the shape of a kidney bean, and then turning in circles. Boxers also make a unique sound, called a "woo-woo," when they want something or are excited. It is not exactly a bark, but rather sounds as though they are saying "woo-woo," look at me!


Boxers aren't the breed for everyone, but if you like a big dog who likes to cuddle, don't mind a little drool between friends, want a dog that will delight you with his clownish antics and yet be gentle with your children, and most of all, if you are prepared to keep your Boxer physically and mentally stimulated, the Boxer just might be the right dog for you!

Boxer Traits

Paw PrintBoxers are high-energy dogs and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the time, desire, and energy to give them the play and activity they need.

Paw PrintBoxers are exuberant and will greet you ecstatically.

Paw PrintEarly, consistent training is critical--before your Boxer gets too big to handle!

Paw PrintAlthough they are large, Boxers are not "outdoor dogs." Their short noses and short hair make them uncomfortable in hot and cold weather, and they   need to be kept as housedogs.

Paw PrintBoxers mature slowly and act like rambunctious puppies for several years.

Paw PrintBoxers don't just like to be around their family--they need to be around them! If left alone for too long or kept in the backyard away from people, they can become ill-tempered and destructive.

Paw PrintBoxers drool, a lot. Boxers also snore, loudly.

Paw PrintAlthough they have short hair, Boxers shed, especially in the spring.

Paw PrintBoxers are intelligent and respond well to firm but fun training. They also have an independent streak and don't like to be bossed around or treated harshly. You'll have the biggest success in training your Boxer if you can make it fun for him.

Paw PrintSome Boxers take their guarding duties a little too seriously, while others may not exhibit any guarding instincts at all.

Care
Boxers are housedogs. Their short noses and short coats make them unsuited to living outdoors, although they'll enjoy having a fenced yard to play in.
Boxers love to play. To keep their muscles toned and satisfy their need for exercise, plan on playing with them or walking them at least twice a day for half an hour. Play fetch, take him for long walks, or get him involved in dog sports such as agility or flyball. Giving your Boxer plenty of daily exercise is the best way to ensure good behavior. A tired Boxer is a good Boxer.

Training is essential for the Boxer. He's so big and strong that he can accidentally hurt people by knocking them over if he doesn't learn to control his actions. The Boxer's temperament plays a role in his trainability. He's happy and excitable, bouncy, and a bit of a mischief-maker. Getting him to take training seriously requires starting early and using firm, fair training methods and positive motivation in the form of praise, play, and food rewards. Be consistent. Your Boxer will notice any time you let him get away with something, and he'll push to see what else he can get away with. Before you head to training class, settle him down a little with an energetic walk or play session

Crate training is recommended.

Children and other pets

Paw PrintBoxers love kids and are great playmates for active older children. They can be too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and can accidentally knock them down in play.

Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
Boxers can get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them.

 

(information taken from www.dogtime.com/dog-breeds/boxer)